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POMELLATO IS "ITALIANA"

Pomellato is pleased to sponsor the exhibition project Italiana. L’Italia vista dalla moda 1971-2001 [Italiana. Italy Through the Lens of Fashion 1971 — 2001], designed and curated by Maria Luisa Frisa and Stefano Tonchi.
 

Across the three decades highlighted in this exhibition, prêt-à-porter overtook haute couture in fashion relevance. Simultaneously, Milan effectively became Italy’s fashion capital, as well as one of the leading epicenters for the international fashion system.
 
Because of the important social changes of the 1960s, Pino Rabolini was inspired to create the Pomellato jewelry collection, designed to appeal to the era’s modern woman. Initially consisting of just six gold pieces, he launched his first collection in 1967 to encapsulate the tastes and needs of this new woman, as she blazed her revolutionary trail and took on leading roles both in life and work. As a more emancipated woman than ever before, she naturally necessitated different clothes and jewelry, as she faced different daily challenges and realities.
 
Fascinated and inspired by the revolutionary movement at hand, Rabolini conceived a jewelry concept to combine design and quality craftsmanship with a more daily accessibility. His dynamic designs gave modern forms to gold, as it was sculpted into big chains, articulated pendants, and classic gourmettes.
 
Beyond other important elements of Italian fashion design, Pomellato has grasped the importance of the jewel imagery it used, since the beginning. Pomellato’s very first ad campaign, which appeared in Vogue Italia in 1971, used Gian Paolo Barbieri’s famous double photograph of Lilly Bistrattin sinuously fused to herself – an image that artistically emphasized the soft curves of the jewelry she was wearing.
 
This already exampled the Pomellato spirit, unconventional and pioneering – and introduced a new way of seeing jewelry, breaking years of tradition and convention. In this rebellious yet refreshing way, Pomellato has made an indelible contribution to the renaissance of Milanese design.

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